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Full text of "Century I, notes on Sullivan, Illinois, 1845-1872-1972"

977.3675 

M86c MOULTRIE COUNTY HISTORICAL 
AND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY 



CENTURY I, NOTES ON SULLIVAN 
ILLINOIS, 1845-1872-1972 




CENTURY I 

NOTES ON SULLIVAN, ILLINOIS 
1845 - 1872 ' 1972 




MOULTRIE COUNTY HISTORICAL 
AND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY 



Century I, Notes on Sullivan, Illinois 

A Guidebook vo Historic Sites 



The Moultrie County Historical and Genealogical Society invites the 
reader to take a tour with us through the early years of Sullivan. By 
using the numbers in the book and on the enclosed map, some of our 
local historic sites can be reviewed, either in an armchair or on a drive 
around the town. A dagger indicates the site is still intact. 

This is not a complete history of Sullivan, but simply a general 
review in guidebook form of the highlights of its first half century. 
Unfortunately, we are not able to include all of the significant sites or 
mention all of its leading citizens in a pamphlet of this size. 

The information here is from the three published histories of 
Moultrie County, courthouse deed records, unpublished memoirs, 
historical society program notes, city council minutes, personal in- 
terviews and newspaper articles. Special acknowledgement is given to 
the David Davis family of Bloomington for their permission to use 
material from the David Davis Papers, and to the fifty or more people 
who contributed in some way to this booklet. 

We hope that this will stimulate its readers to write down or preserve 
historical information for use in a larger and more complete history 
book of Sullivan and all of Moultrie County. 

The Moultrie County Historical and Genealogical Society 
June, 1973. 




UNIVERSITY OF 
ILLINOIS LIBRARY 



THE WHITE HOUSE 
WASHINGTON 

The Western White House 
San Clemente 

April 4, 19 73 



TO THE PEOPLE OF SULLIVAN, ILLINOIS 



In 1960, I had the pleasure of addressing the 
people of Sullivan, and now I again have the 
opportunity to greet you on the grand occasion 
of Sullivan's one hundredth anniversary of its 
incorporation as a city. 

The incorporation of this city brought with it 
a spirit of enthusiasm, determination, and co- 
operation — qualities which not only have 
helped build a community with a rich heritage, 
but also have contributed to the growth and 
prosperity of the United States as a great 
Nation. 

America still needs these qualities as it faces 
the challenges of this era, and I feel confident 
that the people of Sullivan will strive toward 
their new goals with renewed vigor and dedication, 

My greetings and best wishes to Sullivan! 



CSu^^U^ 



A FUTURE PRESIDENT: - 

During the presidential 
campaign of 1960, both Richard 
M. Nixon and John F. Kennedy 
were invited to appear in 
Sulhvan. To everyone's sur- 
prise, Nixon accepted. A 
buffalo barbeque was held, the 
second that summer, and 
thousands came to hear the 
candidate speak in Wyman 
Park. In November, Nixon lost 
the election, but eight years 
later became President. Unlike 
Nixon, the buffalo barbeque did 
not make a comeback, for this 
was the last one at Sullivan. 




FUTURE PRESIDENTS SPOKE IN SULLIVAN 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN SPOKE IN FREELAND GROVE during his 
campaign for the U. S. Senate in 1858. The site of his speech was ap- 
proximately the entrance of the Civic Center. A monument was erected 
at the south edge of Wyman Park, replacing the old marker, during the 
Illinois Sesquicentennial in 1968. The trees under which Lincoln spoke 
were removed when the Civic Center was erected in 1965. 




jAteJjind Qjwvi 



Su-LLivar 



I. Sullivan's Beginnings 



A BEAUTIFUL PLACE - 

Asa "Dollarhide" Rice and Jacob McCune were having another 
successful hunt. They were covering unfamiliar territory north of the 
Kaskaskia River, and had just traveled onto the prairie again. 

Before them a green ocean of prairie grass stretched almost as far as 
the eye could see. A line of trees bounding it on the east, south and 
west, took on the hazy blue of a distant shorehne. Here and there the 
sea of grass was splashed with the rainbow colors of prairie flowers- 
yellows, violets, blues. The wind blew waves in the tall grasses and the 
sunUght was reflected as on frothy whitecaps. They had just passed 
through a line of timber which meandered northward, and then ended in 
a point where the stream and prairie met. To the north, the green of the 
prairie flowed into the blue of a lake two miles long. 

Asa said, "Of all the country I've seen, this is my choice." His 
companion responded, "This shall be called Asa's Point." 

Many years later, in 1845, a town and county seat was founded in 
this idyllic setting. First called Asa's Point, it soon was given the more 
sophisticated name of Sulhvan, after Sullivan's Island in Charleston 
Harbor, S. C, where Gen. William Moultrie so ably defended his fort 
during the Revolutionary War. Another version (John Freeland's) 
states that the city was named for Gen. John SuUivan, a northern 
officer, since Moultrie was a southerner. 

The setting for the new county seat may have been beautiful, but, for 
health reasons, it was not a very good choice for a town site. The Eagle 
Pond to the north and the poorly drained prairies were breeding 
grounds for malaria carrying mosquitoes. 

The httle village of East Nelson, now known as Old Nelson, was a 
more logical site for a county seat. It was located on the south side of 
the Kaskaskia River near the Old Bend, and was further removed from 
the miasmic conditions of Asa's Point on the prairie. It had been in 
existence for ten years, having several stores and a mill; and most 
importantly, the trail toward Charleston passed through it, crossing 
the river ford near there. It was unfortunate for East Nelson that the 
east side of the county did not have enough votes to make it the county 
seat. 

There was nothing at Asa's Point when it was chosen. It was simply 
a point of timber and a Httle stream named by two hunters many years 
before. Even though the town soon lost Asa's Rice's name, it is still 
retained in Asa Creek which flows through the town. 



AT THE DROP OF A PEN- 

On a cold day in the winter of 1844, the commissioners gathered in 

the home of Dr. WiUiam Kellar to decide which 40 acres to choose for a 
site for SuUivan. Philo Hale, a benevolent land speculator and a large 
landowner in Macon County had offered to sell half of his 80 acres near 
Asa Creek. An open ditch ran through a low spot between the two 40 
acre plots, but the land rose gently to the north and south. A cour- 
thouse built on either rise would be prominent. 

The county commissioners were at an impasse, so Parnell Hamilton 
suggested that they "Put up a stake and be governed by its fall." At 
that moment, the pen with which the chairman, R. B. Ewing, was 
writing fell from his fingers and pointed north. Taking this as an omen, 
they chose the north forty, and the original town was bounded by 
Jackson, Hamilton, Water, and Douglas (later Worth) Streets. It was 
purchased by Dr. Kellar and others for $100 and then donated to the 
county on February 28, 1845. 

Charles Martin Cochran recalled the following legend about Parnell 
Hamilton, the county surveyor: 

It was said that Hamilton, in laying out the city, trained his 
instruments at the courthouse site on a flagpole just west of the 
present C.&E.I. railroad tracks. So he could see the pole clearly 
he tied a whisky jug at the top, and people always joked about 
the town being laid out with a whisky jug. 

The organization of the town was the death knell for East Nelson and 
Glasgow. Glasgow was a town platted in 1840 by William Cantrill, a 
Macon County businessman, at the first crossroads south of Sullivan 
on the west side of Route 32. 

One sour note was heard at the beginning of SulUvan. Ebenezer 
Noyes, promoter and large land-owner in Whitley Township, saw his 
dream town of Essex doomed with the growth of Sullivan. He said, 
"It's a shame to spoil a good 40 acres with a town Uke Sullivan." 



XL A Frontier Village— 1845-1872 



SULLIVAN'S FIRSTS- 

Perryman House (1) SW corner, Harrison and VanBuren 

John Ferryman, a merchant from East Nelson, must have been 
anxious to get SuUivan underway, because in May, 1845, only two 
months after its site was determined, he moved into his small frame 



house, becoming the first resident of SulHvan. His responsibilities were 
heavy as both county treasure and school commissioner. He was also 
appointed the town's postmaster and delivered mail which arrived from 
Shelbyville by horseback every two weeks. In 1848, he was elected 
circuit clerk and later operated a dry goods store on the south side of 
the square. 

Freeland Log Cabin (2) NW or NE corner, Adams and Washington 

John A. Freeland, the county clerk, was the second resident of 
SulUvan, coming here from Marrowbone Township in July of 1845. His 
was the first log cabin in town, having moved it from Glasgow. He was 
glad to see the court have a permanent place instead of the temporary 
locations of Campfield Point and East Nelson. 

Richard J. Oglesby, future governor and U. S. Senator from Illinois, 
first practiced law in the old Freeland cabin and was the first lawyer in 
town. He left in the spring of 1846 to fight in the Mexican War. Decatur 
claims Oglesby as a native son, but Sullivan played a part also in the 
life of this great Illinoisian. 

There were seven houses or cabins built in Sullivan by the end of the 
first year. Joseph Thomason's was on the corner of Van Buren and 
Monroe Streets. He was county sheriff in 1846, and his brother Arnold 
Thomason, who lived with him for a time, spent 30 years in various 
offices in the county. The other homes were built by Owen Seaney, a 
blacksmith; Andrew Scott, county commissioner and the builder of the 
first county courthouse; Rowland Hampton, a county commissioner; 
and Thomas Randoll, a carpenter. Note that most of these first 
residents were either engaged in the actual building of the town, or were 
county officers. 

Earp Saloon (3) NW corner, Harrison and Washington 

Joel Earp's (pronounced "Arp") enterprise was not only the first 
business, but the first of many saloons. Sullivan was a rough frontier 
town, and saloons and the affects of their liquor added a lot of local 
color to our history. Earp sold this business in 1848 and it was later 
operated by Keedy and Brown. 

Oglesby Store (4) SE corner, Jefferson and Washington 

WiUiam Cantrill sold his small frame store building at Glasgow to 
Warner W. Oglesby and he moved it into SulUvan to this site in 1845, 
making his dry goods store the second business here. Oglesby moved to 
Decatur the next year, apparently not impressed with the business 
opportunities in Sullivan. 

First Blacksmith Shop (5) corner, Washington and Water 

Blacksmith shops, hke filling stations today, were one business 



every town had to have. Isaac Funderburk started one in this location 
the first year. Owen Seaney also had a blacksmith shop in 1845, on the 
southeast corner of Harrison and Van Buren. 



First School House (6) lot 2, block 11 on East Harrison 

In the summer of 1846, the first school was taught here in a httle 
frame building. The school master was a young attorney from Christian 
County, John W. Wheat. This httle school was used until the SulUvan 
Academy was opened. It was also where court was held before the 
courthouse was completed in 1848. Later it was moved across the street 
and used as a stable. 

In the 1850's a two story brick was built on East Water (7) by 
members of the Christian Church, and was used until the North Side 
School opened. This lot has sat idle since then, as the original owners 
stipulated that it be used only for school purposes. 



Taylor Hotel (8) NE corner. Main and Harrison 

In 1847, Beverly Taylor, a miller from Marrowbone Township, 
erected a two story frame hotel or tavern, the first here. The old county 
history says that the hotel had several nicely furnished rooms; but, the 
circuit riders apparently avoided it if at all possible on their biannual 
visits to Sullivan. Judge David Davis, then traveling the Eighth 
Judicial Circuit, said of it, "The tavern was so tough that I should have 
been in a bad humor to have staid there." By 1857, Joseph Thomason 
was operating the hotel, then called the Eagle House (probably after 
the eagles who nested north of town in the walnut grove along Eagle 
Pond). 



First Churches 

SulUvan may have been a rough town in its early days, but it was a 
religious town. 

The Methodist circuit was serving this area as early as 1826, in- 
cluding SulUvan in 1846. In 1848, they built the first church in town on 
the northeast corner of Jefferson and Madison (9). They moved to their 
present site in 1862. 

The Christian organization predated the formation of SuUivan, 
organizing in the home of Levi Patterson in 1840. Later, it used the 
Methodist building until 1853 when they buiU .heir own church on the 
southwest corner of Worth and Harrison (lu). The Christians wor- 
shiped on this corner for 120 years. Bushrod Henry, their first preacher, 
was a founder of Eureka College. 

The Presbyterians were organized in 1848 and its first building 
erected in 1853 on the southwest corner of Main and Jackson (11). 
Although the present church is across the street from their first 
building site, they have always worshiped on the same intersection. 



LINCOLN'S FOOTSTEPS - 



First Courthouse (12) 1848-1864 

Two years after Sullivan was founded, the first official courthouse of 
the county was begun. The county commissioners chose one of their 
members, Andrew Scott, to be the contractor. It was a two story brick, 
38 feet square. A rail fence surrounded the yard to keep out the hogs 
and cows which roamed freely through the village. It was ready for use 
in 1848. 

To the pioneer, one of his most exciting diversions was to go to town 
when court was in session, for the village came alive on these days. If a 
town visitor could not get into the crowded court room, he could always 
gossip with friends around the square, "wet his whistle" on sod-corn 
row or do some trading with the merchants. A picture of the activity of 
a typical day can be seen from this item in an October, 1858 issue of the 
Sullivan Express: 

Circuit Court in session— docket not so full as common— pretty 
fair representation of the legal profession from several of our 
neighboring towns — quite a number of political speeches 
made — sod-corn whiskey in demand— town constable very 
busy — northeast corner of courthouse, lower floor, somewhat 
crowded — town constable charged with being drunk, arrested, 
tried and honorable acquitted— peddlers make a great deal of 
fuss to sell their ''Yankee notions''— all our merchants who 
advertise in the Express very busy — those who do not advertise, 
not trading much — would tell more but owing to ill health were 
not able to take items. 

The crowded area referred to above was the first jail located in the 
northeast corner of the basement of the courthouse. The jail was very 
inadequate, and most prisoners were taken to neighboring counties for 
incarceration. Of the four known overnight occupants, two escaped, 
and one of the ones who did not was a donkey, placed there by 
pranksters. 

The judge in the following article (compiled by Glen Cooper in 1946) 
was probably Judge David Davis of Bloomington, the judge of the 
Eighth Judicial Circuit which served Moultrie: 

Around 1851, the presiding judge in the Moultrie' circuit court 
was a man who couldn't ponder legal questions deeply unless he 
could do something with his hands. So, he usually got out his 
knife and whittled while a trial proceeded. The courthouse had a 
basement jail, which, because of its filthy conditions, was 
referred to as ''the Stable". 




THE FIRST COURTHOUSE may have looked like this sketch. An 
1864 picture of its burned out shell shows the position of the windows 
and four chimneys. The roof style is in question, but it apparently had 
no cupola. On the second floor was the courtroom. 



The whittling judge insisted upon dignity in his court and 
demanded that spectators remain in their seats. During a trial 
one day, a band of Indians passed through Sullivan. They at- 
tracted much attention and one of the court room spectators 
made frequent trips to the window to watch them. The judge's 
irritation increased each time the man walked to the window. 
Finally, the judge ordered the sheriff to ''put that hoss in the 
stable,'' and the violator of the court's dignity was locked in jail. 

Through the doors of this courthouse, Abraham Lincoln passed 
many times while he traveled on our circuit from 1849 to 1852. The 
judge and entourage of circuit riding lawyers came to SuUivan twice a 
year and stayed about two days. The circuit lawyers were usually 
highly experienced, and often the local lawyers turned their cases over 
to them. 

Few records have been kept of Lincoln's appearances here. In one 
incident, however, some of Lincoln's humor is preserved. The 
prosecuting attorney at the time was David Campbell. Campbell had 
just been in a fight during which the seat of his pants was torn off. 
Some of the other lawyers present suggested that they buy Campbell a 
new pair of pants. When they approached Lincoln, he said, "I can not 
conscientiously contribute anything to the end in view." 

This courthouse was destroyed by fire in November of 1864, and 
many early records were lost. 



James Elder's Home (13) SW corner, Main and Harrison 

When James Elder came to Sullivan in 1845, he was already a well 
established merchant in the county, having kept store at East Nelson 
for ten years. Elder saw the opportunities in SuUivan, built his first 
residence on this site and his store building across the street north. He 
and his wife kept transient guests in their two story home, and Mrs. 
Elder was stiff competition for the hotel located diagonally across the 
intersection. The circuit riders, including Lincoln and Judge Davis, 
preferred to board with Mrs. Elder rather than stay at the crude local 
inn. 

Lincoln stayed in Elder's second home on East Jackson (14)t the 
night preceeding his appearance in SuUivan in 1858, described on the 
next page. Douglas had spent the night with Robert Ginn about five 
miles east of town and was led into town by a procession. The Sullivan 
Express said, "In passing the residence of Judge Elder, half a mile east 
of town, A. Lincoln was espied standing upon the porch, when another 
tremendous cheering for Douglas took place." It is said that the back 
two or three rooms of the present house are part of the original Elder 
home. 



Lincoln-Douglas "Riot" (15)t East of Courthouse 

Probably one of the most infamous events to occur in Sullivan's 
history was the day of the "riot" between the supporters of Lincoln and 
Douglas when they appeared here in 1858. This fracas may have been 
the only one of its kind during that long summer of campaigning for the 
U. S. Senate. They had engaged in a series of now famous debates all 
over the state, but had many separate speaking engagements, as their 
Sullivan appearance on September 20th was to be. Their fourth debate 
took them to Charleston two days before. 

Apparently, their dual appearance in Sullivan was a coincidence of 
scheduhng, although Douglas accused Lincoln of following him around 
the state to capitalize on the crowds he had gathered. He indeed 
gathered crowds, for early in the day they began streaming into the 
little village from all the neighboring counties. 

After a morning spent in parading into and around the town, and 
then celebrating at the Eagle House, Douglas began his two hour 
speech at 1 o'clock. The Express described the ensuing events: 

A short time after two o'clock, as the Judge was making a point 
on Mr. Lincoln, which struck terror to their hears, the abolition 
part of the audience hurried off, and with full band playing and 
all the discordant vocal noise that they could muster, assembled 
at the ''Eagle House'\ northwest corner of public square, where 
they kept up the din a short time. 



Lincoln's supporters were smaller in number, but their enthusiasm 
more than made up the difference. The main feature of their procession 
was a huge wagon twenty-four feet by sixty-four feet long with wheels 
that were cut from a hickory log three and one half feet in diameter, and 
it was pulled by thirty-six yoke of oxen. Upon this rode one hundred 
people, including the band and those running the animated exhibits on 
the wagon. 

The Lincoln procession, led by this huge wagon, proceeded coun- 
terclockwise around the square. At this point, Douglas took note of the 
disturbance, and asked the audience to ignore them and "let the 
howlers pass, for I can speak louder than their noise." 

Instead of bypassing the crowd on the east side of the square, the 
Lincoln procession turned and drove right through the middle of the 
Douglas gathering. "In a few minutes the confusion was general, coats 
were drawn, clubs flourished in the air and everything seemed favorable 
to a general melee," said the Sulhvan Express. 

One of the exhibits on the Lincoln wagon depicted the evils of 
slavery with an overseer whipping two slaves working in a cotton field, 
all set in motion by a small windmill. F. M. Green, the creator of this 
controversial cotton field, was one casualty: 

As the wagon was about to pass the viewing stand. . .a mob, 
infuriated by my exhibit, sent a shower of missiles at my cotton 
field, and one of the bricks made that dent in my forehead. 

Lincoln and his supporters then went out to Freeland Grove where 
he delivered his speech. The town was still in turmoil that evening and 
there were threats of more violence, which, fortunately, did not 
materialize. 

There are so many different versions of what did happen that day 
that it is difficult to ascertain the truth. Accounts written by 
Democrats usually play down the violence and place the blame on the 
Republicans who interrupted their meeting, while the Repubhcans 
accuse the Democrats of assaulting their peaceful procession. Whatever 
is true, passions were still running high fifty years later. The eyes of 
James T. Taylor, a Douglas man, lit up while reminiscing about the riot 
and he exclaimed, "Now they had no right to do that!" 

Freeland Grove (16) Bounded by Wyman Park, Main, Strain, Worth. 
On the north edge of the old village of Sullivan was located a 
beautiful grove of trees known as Freeland Grove, the unofficial park 
for many years. Fourth of July picnics, tent meetings and political 
rallies were held in the cool shade of its trees. Owned by John Freeland, 
who built his later home on the west side of this grove, it was the site of 
Lincoln's speech on September 20, 1858. 



STRUGGLING TO IMPROVE - 

Sod-corn Row (17) North side of square 

During this early period of history, a tavern and a saloon were on 
either end of the north side of the square and other establishments of a 
like nature later located there. John R. Eden discussed the atmosphere 
of the town of 1853: 

At that time the village had no policemen and some of the 
rougher elements that usually gets out as soon as civilization 
becomes established wtill remained in the county. This part of 
the population when in town, made the saloon their 
headquarters. They at times indulged in fist fights and other 
disorderly conduct, as a result of which the north side of the 
square was called than and for a long time subsequent, ''sod- 
corn row"". 

In 1857, an indignant letter was written to the editor of the SuUivan 
Express: 

From the seeming taste, and business like appearance of your 
citizens, I was somewhat astonished to see men and women have 
to go paddling along through the mud around the aquare, from 
the fact that there are no sidewalks. 

I notice in some places wood piled up where there should be 
sidewalks; particularly on the south side of the square. On the 
north side, or what is called ''sod-corn row'\ there is not a 
vestiage of a walk-way. I suppose on that side of town there is no 
particular need of walks for they that visit the bacchanalian 
halls there, would go, mud or no mud. But, from the mere fact, of 
there being no side walks there, I think should act as a stimulus, 
and cause those living on other streets of the town, bo build 
sidewalks in order to show a difference between grog and no 
grog. — A Chicago Plug 

In spite of the atmosphere on the north side of the square, the town 
was mainly inhabited by responsible, peaceful citizens. As Eden said, 
"This much is true, that without ordinances, or municipal officers, and 
with but a few peace officers of any kind, the people of Sullivan were as 
orderly and law abiding in 1853 as they have been at any time since." 

By the 1870 's the atmosphere on this side was improved, due to the 
efforts of city marshall, James T. Taylor, the first strong temperance 
man to run the police force. 



Sullivan Academy, Moultrie County Academy or "Bastion Seminary" 

(18) North of 418 South Washington 

At an early day there was a desire for Sullivan to improve. One of the 
men who contributed most toward this in the 1850's was John A. 
Freeland's brother, James S., a teacher and Presbyterian preacher. By 
1850 he had started a private school of secondary education, teaching 
his first classes in the new courthouse. He constructed the SulUvan 
Academy, a two story brick, in 1851. Freeland died in 1856, but con- 
trary to information in earlier histories, an 1857 Sullivan Express item 
indicates the school continued under the leadership of a board of 
trustees: 

The fourth annual session of this institution will commence on 
Monday the 5th of October, 1857. The prospects of the school 
were never brighter than at present. Good teachers have been 
procured and every arrangement made to render the pupils 
comfortable and advance them in the various departments of 
literature. Scholars from a distance will be furnished with bood 
boarding, convenient to the academy. 

B. W. Henry, Pres. B. T; Dennis Cokely, Principal 

Prof. Washington Smith purchased the academy in 1858 from the 
Freeland estate and sold it in the same year to N. S. Bastion, a 
Christian Church minister and his wife, Eunice. It is known that the 
Bastion's operated the school as the Moultrie County Academy or the 
"Bastion Seminary" through the late 1860's and early 1870's. Bastion 
stressed the usual study of the classics. It ceased to be a private school 
a couple of years before the first high school was built and public school 
classes were held in this building. 



Second Courthouse (12) 1865-1904 

After the first building burned in 1864, a larger courthouse (50 
square feet) was built on the same site. All the materials had to be 
hauled from the railroad town of Mattoon except the brick, which was 
made at Dunn by Sam Brooks. The money for the new structure was 
obtained by Judge Eden, who arranged for the sale of the county's 
swamplands given to it earlier by the state. Thus, within a few years, 
most of the unsettled prairie of the county was sold and farmed for the 
first time. The health of the county was improved and the farming 
income increased as the prairies were drained. It can be said, then, that 
each brick of this second courthouse represented one more step in the 
general improvement of the county. The yard surrounding the court- 
house was filled with trees, and an outhouse adorned the east lawn. 
(See page one) 



■m*i^. 



_1 



THE FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH BUILDING AND THE OLD 
WATER TOWER stood on the same block. Like most churches built in 
the 1850's, there was a door for each sex. The bell was moved from this 
building to the second church on this site, and was used until 1973. 



Old Well (19) South side Eden Street, at end of Market 

Besides private wells and several located on the square, there was a 
good well located one-fourth of a mile from the southeast corner of the 
old town. The ladies of the town made a beaten path through the prairie 
grasses to it. A well for fire protection was dug in 1871 on the southeast 
corner of the courthouse lawn, but it was inadequate. In 1887, a sixty 
foot high wooden storage tank (20) was erected which was to protect 
the business district. 

BUSINESSES AND INDUSTRIES OF THE FRONTIER 
VILLAGE - 

Sullivan's merchants had a hard time in the first years. Competition 
from railroad towns in neighboring counties was strong; nevertheless, a 
few were successful, and some are alive today. 

Corbin Furniture Store (21 )t South side of square 

A furniture business started by W. P. Corbin in 1851 is the oldest 
continuous business in Sullivan, and was owned by the Corbin family 
for 110 years. Corbin at first made his own furniture, assembling the 
pieces from native wood in a small factory on Washington Street. The 
business was in the same location on the south side of the square from 
1872 until 1965 when it was moved to the west edge of town by its new 
owners. 



The Sullivan Progress 

The Sullivan Progress is the second oldest business, but the oldest 
one under the same name. Established in 1856 as The Sullivan Express, 
its name was changed to The Sulhvan Progress in 1869. It has been a 
Democratic paper most of its life. Early copies of The Sullivan Express 
are an invaluable source of historical information. The Progress has 
been in many different locations. 



Eden House (13)t SW corner, Main and Harrison 

The Eden House, one of the more famous hotels in Sullivan, was 
^stabUshed in 1864 by Judge Joseph E. Eden, brother of John R. Eden. 
Joseph Eden, who was a merchant, came to Sullivan in 1853. The Eden 
House may have been in the same structure built by James Elder here 
in the 1840's. In 1880, the Eden House burned, but was replaced with a 
three story brick at a cost of $25,000. It had forty sleeping rooms, a 
dining room and parlors, and was considered a very fine hotel for a 
town of SuUivan's size. The Eden House, later called the Savoy Hotel 
and in the 1920's the National Inn, ceased operation in the 1950's. 



Morrell Grist Mill (22) N. Worth opposite Strain intersection 

The main industry in Sullivan most of its first 25 years was the 
Morrell Grist Mill. It was purchased by S. H. Morrell in 1859 from 
Garland and Patterson who built the frame structure in 1852. The late 
Homer Tabor wrote of the Morrell Mill: 

. . .probably from about 1890 to 1900 this historic industry was 
riding the crest of its useful existence. Those among us today. . 
.without too much of a stretch of our imaginations, may envision 
a long line of horse drawn wagons and buggies with the drivers 
waiting on what was. . .either a dusty or muddy north Worth 
Street to have their cereals ground at the mill into corn meal, 
both of which he would take home to the members of his family 
to use in their routine cooking. 

Mr. Appollos Hagerman of Sullivan informed the writer that he 
definitely remembers this old mill with its steam engine that had 
an enormous fly wheel which appealed to him very much as a 
small boy. . . 

Evidently the Morrell Grist Mill burned either shortly before or 
else shortly after the turn of the century. Joseph H. Baker, 
grandfather of the writer, purchased the Morrell Mill site to add 
to his adjacent farm land. . . 



Business Directory of Sullivan in 1865 Plat 

Editors - A.N. Smyser, W. M. Stanley; Sheriff- S. P. Earp 
Physicians - T. Y. Lewis, E. W. Mills, G. Kilner, D. M. Barkley, A.T. 
Marshall, B. B. Everett; Druggist - W. Kilner, H. F. Vadakin 
Attorneys at Law - J. R. Eden, J. Meeker, A. B. Lee, J. B. Titus, W. M. 
Stanley, W. G. Patterson 

Real Estate Brokers - A.N. Smyser, A.B. Lee, W.M. Stanley 
Merchants - J. Eden, C. Roane, J.B. & E.L. Sheperd, Wm. Patterson 
Grocery Merchants - T.F. Schmugge, H.W. Carriker, John R. McClure 
Furniture Merchants - W.P. Corbin, J.B. Shepherd 
Prop. Steam Flouririg Mill • Donty Patterson, J.H. Snyder & Co. 
Stock Traders - B.F. Davis, R.W.Lindsay, Dock Patterson & Bros. 
Carriage, Wagon & Plow Mfg. - F. P. Hoke, R. Lynn, D.L. Pifer 
Blacksmiths • F.P. Hoke, Owen Seaney; Boot & Shoe Maker - J. Goets 
Carpenters & Cabinet Makers - P.F. Goben, F. W. Bushman 

Chair Mfg. - F.W. Bushman; Plasterer - Henry Hunt 

Harness & Saddle Mfg. ■ Wm. Thunemann; Auctioneer - M. Douglas 

Prop. Daily Mail Line From Sullivan to Mattoon - G. W. Gowan & Co. 



Business Directory of Sullivan in 1875 Plat 

Sheriff- Joseph Thomason; Constable - Dock Patterson; City Marshall 
- J. W. Kirkbride; Justice of Peace - Andrew Martin 
Physicians ■ E. W. Mills, C.J. Freeland, G. Kilner, J. F. Sanders 
Attorneys at Law - T. B. Stringfield, Alvin P. Greene, A. B. Lee 
Real Estate ■ A.N. Smyser, Wm. Elder; Patentee - T. H. Beveridge 
Publisher's (Progress) - W. H. Smyser, W. J. Mize 

Postmaster - A. Miley; Banker - X. B. Trower; Barber - Joseph Sona 
Livery Stable - P. B. Gilham; Harness Maker - W. Thunemann 

Wagon & Plow Mfg. - F. P. Hoke, H. W. Bury; Blacksmith ■ Wm. 
Seaney 

Boots & Shoes - Mathias Layman; Auctioneer - Mahlon Douglass 
City Flour Mills - Milton Tichenor; Miller - John WiUiams 

Woolen Mfg. - G. S. Jennings; Soap & Candles -J.B. Stiers 
Stair Builder - John S. Williams; Mason, Plaster - O. B. Nichols • 
Dry Goods - F. E. Ashworth; Photographer - A. A. Frederick 
Grain Dealers - J. H. Baker, W. Kirkwood, J. L. Minor, D.M. and C.P. 
Ritter; Lumber Dealers - A. J. Dix, Conn & Bros., E. Anderson 
Merchants - A. Ping, C. Roane, V. Thompson, J. B. Shepherd 
Gj-ocers - Chas. T. Harris, D. F. Stearns, B. W. Brockway 
Baker -G. Brosam; Restaurant - J. Hefferman, L. Butler 
Saloon & Billards - J.L. Keedy; Tobacco & Cigars - Henry Boka 
Agt. Singer Sewing Machine Co. - A. Chipps, J. Fin 

Hotel Prop. - J.E. Eden, Ann Dooley ; Titus House - E. Titus 
Jewelers - T. F. Woody, F. M. Andrus, W. B. Townsend 



III. A Railroad Town at Last— 1872 



"CHISSELED OUT OF ITS RICHES' - 

By the 1870's Sullivan was stagnating. The 1850's had brought both 
the Illinois Central and the Terre Haute and Alton Railroads to Coles 
County, and our citizens watched with envy as Mattoon sprang up at 
their intersection, soon surpassing Sullivan in size and in business 
activity. According to I. J. Martin, our civic leaders "were quite sure 
that the Chicago branch of the Central would not bypass an important 
town like Sullivan..." Their disappointment was great and an 1858 
Express item claimed the area was being "chisseled" out of its riches. 
John Freeland said in an 1876 Progress: 

One could hear the wagons going to Mattoon and other points 
before day and returning after night, while in Sullivan no one 
came to trade only some poor fellow that had nothing to sell and 
wanted credit until next Christmas. Our county was literally 
starved to death and our money and trade taken to build 
railraod towns all around us. Our men of enterprise were leaving 
us. Older and more prosperous counties around us formed 
combinations and legislated against us. 



Bond issues were passed to entice railroads to the area, but by 1858 
the taxpayers had nothing to show for their generosity but a Httle 
grading and surveying from two railroad schemes that had failed. The 
Civil Vvar intervened, but finally, in 1872, Sullivan had acquired the 
coveted title of "railroad town". 

Much excitement was generated when the first train rolled into town, 
consisting of a boxcar pushed by an engine. This first railroad was the 
Decatur, Sullivan and Mattoon line, and after many name changes is 
now the Illinois Central. The 1870 's brought one more line, the Chicago 
and Paducah, known later as the Wabash, and a third railroad went 
through the northern part of the county. 

Suddenly, the taxpayers were faced with three railroads waiting to 
collect on the $400,000 in bonds passed the decade before. Freeland 
defended the harassed county this way: 

In justice to our people let it be remembered that when we 
commenced voting subsidies we were in hopes of getting some 
one road and did not think of getting them all. We felt we had 
voted too much, and as we now had the roads, and would have to 



pay, a feeling of discontent came on a portion of our enthusiastic 
citizens, which was encouraged by some would be office holders 
and fee catchers. So far the fee catchers have come out the best 
as the treasury can testify. 

The last railroad to be built through Sullivan was the Chicago and 
Eastern Illinois, built in 1891. 

The twenty year delay in getting a railroad to Sullivan is the main 
reason it is smaller than cities of the same age in neighboring counties. 
Nevertheless, it can be said the quality of life here is far superior to 
theirs. 



INCORPORATING A CITY- 

1872 was a banner year for SulUvan. To celebrate its revitalization 
and to express confidence in Sullivan's future prosperity, the founding 
fathers incorporated as a city in December of 1872. It had first been 
incorporated as a village in 1850 and as a town in the 1860's. The city 
officials were so enamored of Sullivan's new status as a railroad town 
that they included a railroad engine in their first city seal. (See front 
cover) 

THE PRESENT COURTHOUSE AS IT APPEARED IN 1917 





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AROUND THE SQUARE - 

The Present Courthouse 

The second courthouse was too small by the turn of the century and 
was torn down for the present courthouse which was completed in 1906. 
The cannon on the courthouse lawn is reputed to be from old Fort 
Moultrie in Charleston, S. C. On the southeast corner is a monument of 
a Union soldier which used to hold an iron musket. It was erected by 
Fred Sona, an immigrant monument maker, to face his shop on the east 
side. The monument on the northeast corner commemorates Lincoln's 
circuit riding days here. The W.C.T.U. fountain on the northwest 
corner originally had a figure of a boy pouring water from a boot. 

Titus Opera House (8) NE corner, Main and Harrison 

By the 1870 's sod-corn row was gone, and the north side of the 
square became the center of Sullivan's entertainment and social hfe. 
Built by J. B. Titus in 1871, the opera house was considered one of the 
finest in the area. Located on the second and third stories of the 
building, the large auditorium, balcony and box seats could ac- 
commodate 800. 

The estabUshment offered a wide variety of entertainment, including 
traveling theatrical companies, lectures and talented local musicians. 
Since it was the largest hall in town, school commencements, balls and 
other big gatherings were held there. 

The Opera House burned in 1910, but its cultural influence was long 
lasting in Sullivan. Titus's daughter, Winifred Titus Sentel, (who later 
taught voice and piano to two generations of young people) wrote of its 
influence on her Ufe: 

Good attractions were booked and one especially that I so well 
remember was the concert given by the great Brazilian pianist, 
Teresa Carreno. Her playing thrilled me and inspired me so, that 
I longed to be able to play the piano. The opera house was my 
playground, and after a stock company had filled the weekly 
engagement, my playmates came, and we would, to the best of 
our abilities, in this world of make-believe, give the plays over 
again. 

Oldest Building on Square (t) NW corner, Harrison and Washington 
On the site of the first business in Sullivan, stands today what it said 
to be the oldest building on the square. It is a two story brick built by 
Dr. T. Y. Lewis sometime between 1866 and 1872. On the unaltered east 
side the original window cornices can be seen. 




North Side of Square 

It was a hot summer day in 1881, too hot for much trade. What 
better time for A. S. Creech to get a picture? The windows of John R. 
Eden's law office on the second floor corner of Titus's Opera House 
were pushed all the way up except for that one that always had to be 
propped. Down below, the merchandise of the general store on the 
corner was stored under the awning, almost hiding the two proprietors 
and their window display of hats. G. O. Andrews, the "merchants 
tailor", hurried from his store in the middle of the block to put his new 
sewing machine closer to the camera, and situated himself in front of 
the opera house stairs. L. M. Spitler and his son prided themselves on 
neatly stacked merchandise — the cans in their window, and the 
pots,kegs, brooms and sacks outside. Those four gas Ughts in front (to 
illuminate the street for the opera house patrons) were another source 
of pride, for they were the only ones in town, but someone really should 
straighten them! 

The awning over the Vadakin "Drugs" building next door was lower 
and made a cool spot for loafing in the uncluttered area in front of the 
Andrews shop. Mose Ansbacher, the Jewish merchant, had a rack of 
bargain clothes on the sidewalk. The Journal management (in the two 
story brick), Harry J. Pike (the jeweler in one of the little wooden 
buildings), and the proprietors of the City Book Store (in Dr. Lewis's 
building at the end) did not bother to come out for the picture. 



East Side of Square 

A pedestrian on the east side of the square in about 1880 encountered 
d mixture of sights and smells. The meat market (not pictured), besides 
selling meat, bought hides and pelts. The market's smell of fresh blood 
and saw dust mingled with the heavy aroma of oiled leather, the 
distinctive smell of a harness shop next door. At the sign of the boot 
(see left of picture). Mat Layman was working at his cobbler's bench. 
From the open door of Brosam Bros. Bakery came mouth watering 
aromas of fresh baked goodies. Several customers were in John R. 
McClure's grocery, indicating that his 23 year old business was in much 
better condition than his two story wooden building. Several slabs of 
marble were lying in the street in front of Fred Sona's Marble Shop, 
waiting to become grave markers through the skillful blows of his 
chisel. Above the hardware at the end of the block was the law office of 
I. J. Mouser, with whom young Albert J. Beveridge, a future U. S. 
Senator, spent many long hours learning about law and politics. 

Across the street south a few men had stopped to visit in front of 
Mayer's Dry Goods Emporium while on their way to pick up their mail 
at the post office next door. Beyond Citcuit Clerk Joseph Waggoner's 
white frame house could be seen the unused Bastion Seminary (far 
right of picture). 





THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE SQUARE IN 1917 



Oldest Group of Buildings on the Square ( 23 )t corner, Jefferson and 
Washington. 

William Elder, an enterprising businessman, either built or acquired 
soon after construction the three buildings on this intersection. He first 
built about 1873 the two story brick on the northeast corner. The row of 
two story buildings on the southwest comer were next built around 
1874 by Elder and A. N. Smyser. About 1876, Charles Crow, a 
blacksmith, built the large two story brick on the southeast corner and* 
sold it to Elder in 1877. Its ornate cornice has been removed, but, 
fortunately, the other two buildings have had very little done to change 
their original appearance. The three story Corbin store, which joins the 
Elder and Smyser row on the west, dates to 1872. (See picture above) 

Albert Wyman Shoe Store (24)t NW corner, Jefferson and Main 

The money used to create Wyman Park was earned in this building. 
It was built in 1885 by Albert Wyman, a German born shoe maker, who 
at his death willed the funds for the park. It was also the site of the 
earher dry goods store of Charles L. Roane, member of the state 
legislature in the 1880's. 



First National Bank ( 13)t SW comer, Harrison and Main 

This bank has been fortunate in having a long history of responsible 
management. Established in 1891 as a state bank, it was changed to a 
national bank in 1905. X. B. Trower's Moultrie County Bank of the 
1870's and The Merchant and Farmer's Bank of W. A. Steele had 
dismal periods, but space does not permit their history to be told. 




THE WEST SIDE OF THE SQUARE IN 1917 

"Horse Avenue" (25) North Main, between Harrison and Jackson 

There were so many hver\' stables and blacksmiths north of the 
square on Main Street that it was known as "Horse Avenue". 
Traveling salesmen arriving by train would rent rigs, farmers left their 
horses at the blacksmiths while in town trading, high school pupils 
from the country boarded their horses, doctors hired drivers or rented 
rigs for their calls in the country, and even the veterinary had his office 
there to be handy to his customers. 

First Paved Streets 

Sulhvan's citizens slopped around the square in the mud or ate its 
dust until 1894. when the streets there were paved with brick. The next 
^ear West Harrison Street was paved from the square to the railroad 
.•aepots. It soon became the most fashionable street as is evident by the 
many old homes still there. This paved street made it more comfortable 
for travehng salesmen as they rode to the Eden House Hotel in the 
Eden Hack. 

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THE BROOM CORN PALACE built for the 1893 Street Fair was an 
attempt to promote the broom corn raising east of town. It was the 
main attraction of the fair, and was located at the intersection of 
Harrison and Main. This view is looking east, and the trees on the right 
are in the courthouse yard. Street Fairs were like carnivals, the booths 
and rides being erected all around the square. 

THE PIFER BRICK YARD located about five miles east ot town 
made bricks for many of the buildings erected in town in the last part of 
the nineteenth century. It was operated by Samuel Pifer, and later by 
his son, David. The pit in the center is for mixing clay, taken from a 
deposit along the creek at the rear. The molded brick was placed in the 
sun to dry, and then burned in the kiln at night. 

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DOWN BY THE RAILROAD-- 

West End Business Area 

By the turn of the century there were three railroad depots serving 
22 trains arriving daily in the two block area on the west end of town. 
The railroad was the main transportation to local towns such as Dunn, 
Cushman, Farlow and Bruce, and to more distant points. There was 
always one policeman stationed in this area to police the depots, the 
saloon (26)t and the Depot Hotel (27), which had an unsavory 
reputation. The Sullivan Bottling Works (28) where Mike Finley made 
ice cream and pop, and the building where P. B. Harshman bought 
cream and made concrete roofing tile (29), were also on the east side of 
the railroads. 

West of the railroad was the Sullivan Grain Company's elevator 
built in 1873 by D. F. Bristow (30)t. John H. Baker's Illinois Bridge 
and Iron Works (31) built the iron river bridges that are still in use all 
over central Illinois. Besides these enterprises, coal companies sent 
their coal wagons from here on city routes. 



THE ILLINOIS BRIDGE AND IRON WORKS, operated by J. H. 
Baker, fabricated the iron bridges which span the rivers of our area. 








THE THREE RAILROAD DEPOTS provided Sullivan with excellent 
service. The Illinois Central depot is on top. In the bottom picture, the 
Wabash depot is on the right with the Central and Eastern Illinois 
depot to its left. Note the West End Elevator on the left. 



Old Fair Grounds (32)t North Market 

"Right this way for the fair grounds!" was the cry of the hack 
drivers on the Eden House corner drumming up business for the long 
ride out to the fair grounds. Going to the fair was an event not to be 
missed, because it was, among other things, an opportunity to renew 
friendships with people not seen since the last fair. The first county fair 
was held in 1857 southeast of town, but with the coming of the railroads 
in 1872, a new fair grounds was built northwest of town to be closer to 
the depots. 

There were two buildings with agricultural and domestic displays, 
Hvestock judging in an ampitheatre, and a half mile track for horse 
races. At the turn of the century, races between Dr. A. D. Miller's 
"Peachie" and Lawrence Purvis's "Rex Americanus" caused great 
excitement among horse racing fans. Henry Hess even named one of 
the cigars he made in his cigar factory (33) after his favorite, "Peachie". 
There were two later race racks east of town. 

SOUTHEAST, OUT BY "DOG TOWN" -(Named for the hound dog 
population) 

East Side Mills 

The industrial center of town was located along the bank of an open 
stream which once ran through here. The first industry was a mill built 
in 1866 by Donty Patterson, J. H. Snyder and McClelland (34). Its 
three stories contained two burrs for grinding wheat into flour and one 
burr for corn meal. By the 1870's it was known as the City Flourmg 
Mills and later as the City Roller Mills. 

A woolen mill (35), another three story brick, was built in 1867 across 
the creek north of the flour mill by Jonathan Patterson and Benjamm 
S. Jennings. By 1881 it was capable of spinning and weaving 100 
pounds of woolen cloth a day. Farmers could have their wool spun mto 
an oxford grey cloth for jeans, hnsey material for dresses or even 
blankets. A soap factory was also operated here in the 1870's 

Greenhill Cemetery (36)t End of East Water 

Once a year on Memorial Day (May 30), the whole town honored the 
war veterans with an all day celebration including a parade to the 
cemetery, speeches and decoration of graves with flowers. The long 
processions consisted of many survivors of the Mexican, Civil and 
Spanish American Wars. Carleton Harris remembered from boyhood 
one Confederate veteran, Charlie Collins, always walking in the parade 
even with his stiff leg that had been wounded while riding with 
Morgan's Raiders. He dehghted in pointing his cane up at the "GAR 
men riding in carriages and saying, ' * I could whip 'em yet! " 

The first burial was James Elder's daughter, Rebecca Berry, in 1847 
while it was still his private burial ground. William Patterson and 




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THE CITY ROLLER MILLS on the east side of town had walls two 
feet thick. This mill and other factories filled a block, and an I. C. track 
was extended to them from the East End Elevator. 

William Kellar also contributed ground to the cemetery. A few of the 
old evergreens here may have been planted in 1857 by B. B. Peddicord, 
a cemetery trustee. 



'Bunker Hill" (36), in Greenhill Cemetery. 
Carleton Harris reminisced about this popular hill now razed: 

In the winter time when we were kids, we would go out east of 
town and using barrel staves for skis, we would take off down 
those hills. We'd have to loop around the buck brush. We always 
coasted at Cemetery Hill. Then we had Bunker Hill out there, 
too. What most people don't know about Bunker Hill is that at 
one time, when they started putting in what was originally the 
Sullivan-Mattoon Railroad and now the I.C, they surveyed this 
railroad to run through the middle of Sullivan, so they graded up 
some dirt in preparation of running the railroad through the 
center of town along Harrison. 



Albert J. Beveridge's Boyhood Home (37) South Polk 

A future senator from Indiana, Albert J. Beveridge, was reared in 
SuUivan and graduated from the high school in the class of 1881. When 
he was six his family came from Ohio to the Sullivan area to farm. 
When a drouth wiped out his father, the family moved into the city to a 
house on this site. His father did a number of different things to make a 
Uving in the hard times of the '70's. A Sullivan newspaper ad of 1874 
spoke of his hay press invention: 

ATTENTION FARMERS! THE LATEST THING OUT! And the 
best and cheapest in the way of bailers-THE FARMERS FRIEND. 
The patentee will have a small machine on exhibition during court, and 
will be prepared to sell farm rights, township rights, county and state 
rights. Now avail yourselves of the easiest and best way to get the most 
money for your hay -T. H. Beveridge, Miley and Co. 

— T. H. Beveridge, Patentee. 



We lost Albert Beveridge to Indiana when he went to DePauw 
University, and then started his law practice in Indianapolis. From 
1899-1911, he became one of the most influential members of the U.S. 
Senate. Along with men Hke Roosevelt, Lodge, Mahan and Blaine, he 
was one of the leading exponents of our country's expansion of power 
into the Pacific at the turn of the century, the pohcy which can be 
traced to our involvement in Viet Nam 60 years later. Later he worked 
with LaFollette and others for reforms that led to the Pure Food and 
DwFg and Meat Inspection Acts of 1906. In later years he wrote out- 
standing biographies of John Marshall and Abraham Lincoln. 

Poland's Pond South of sewage plant 

One of the best recreations of the winter was ice skating, and there 
were plenty of places available before Wyman Park Lake was built. 
Poland's Pond, made to cut ice for their meat market, was one popular 
place. Other popular skating ponds were the depot pond, thought to be 
a buffalo wallow, Patterson's Pond and Harshman's Pond. Even earher 
was the one at Morrell's Mill. Homer Tabor wrote of it: 

My mother told me many times of the very enjoyable and merry 
ice skating parties which she attended in her youth on the 
Morrell Mill Pond, where during the clear cold winter nights 
hundreds of young people would gather to enjoy the exhiliarting 
ice skating sport which was made more rollicking and zestful by 
the snappy music that flowed from the many harmonicas that 
the skaters played. 



Pifer's Ice Business (38) South Main, north of railroad. 

Before the days of electricity, the ice business was important in the 
summertime. CharUe Pifer cut ice in the winter on Guy Pifer's Lake at 
Pifer's Park south of town and stored it in a big ice house there between 
layers of sawdust. He also had a small storage house on this site near 
his house. Ice wagons visited homes every day with a new supply for 
their boxes. Chandler Poland, who used to run an ice route for the 
Poland's remembered: 

Even though ice didn't cost much, some old ladies would wrap 
the ice in paper to keep it from melting. They didn't get the good 
out of it, because it had to melt to get the cold. 



CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS - 

North and South Side Schools (39) (40)tNW corner, Jackson and 
Hamilton, SE corner Adams and Graham. 

The North Side School was an elaborate structure built in 1874 to 
house both the grade and high school classes. The bell in the tall tower 
at the front proved too great a temptation to students at Halloween one 
year. They extended a wire from the base of the bell, across the tree 



NORTH SIDE SCHOOL 











SOUTH SIDE [LOWE] SCHOOL 



tops to a position about a block away, and rang the bell intermittently 
through the night. The police could not find how the bell was being 
rung for no one was in the building. 

After 1897 it was used as a grade school only and the new South Side 
School was the high school. The south school was later named after O. 
B. Lowe, an early principal and county superintendent. The present 
Powers School was built in 1927 and named after the Powers sisters 
who each taught about 50 years in the school system. The Sulhvan 
Township High School was built in 1917 and converted into a junior 
high school in 1959, when the new high school was built. 

City Light Plant (41 )t SE corner. Grant and Adams. 

The erection of electric street lights which may seem to be a simple 
public improvement, proved to be the most controversial issue of the 
new century. At times the atmosphere was so heated, that it could have 
generated electricity without the aid of a steam engine. 

It all started in 1892, when J. H. Baker built a privately owned 
power plant and contracted with the city to supply power for 32 electric 
street Hghts on cloudy and moonless nights. When the contract was 
about to expire at the end of ten years, a new contract, allowing him 
higher rates for his services, was drawn up during secret city board 
meetings, and the town was enraged! After several court battles, and 
the election of the opposition party in 1901, the municipal hght plant 
was installed at the Waterworks in 1903. 



This was not the end of the controversy, as Baker continued to 
operate his plant, too. In 1912, he sold it to the CIPS, who attempted to 
extend electric service in the town in direct competition with the 
municipal plant. CIPS did not have a franchise from the city, so their 
Unemen would come over at midnight to install their new poles and 
Hnes. Time and again, they were brought down from their poles, 
arrested and thrown in jail. In the ensuing court battles, SuHivan 
surprised everyone with the appearance of the famous Clarence Darrow 
as their attorney. He not only demoralized the opposition, but won the 
case. 



TIME LINE OF CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS 

1858 Wooden side walks and crossings were built around the square. 

1872 All new buildings on the square were to be of brick or stone. 

1883 SuUivan went "dry" for two years. 

1885 The City Police Department was established. Gasoline street 
hghts were built with money from saloon licenses. 

1887 A sixty foot high water tank was built for fire protection. 

1889 A bandstand was erected on the courthouse yard. 

1892 Street signs were put on buildings nearest each intersection. 

1894 The streets around the square were paved with brick. 

1895 The first telephone system was installed in the city. 
1898 The city library was established. 

1903 The municipal electric plant was opened. 

1906 Prohibition was again established, lasting until 1933. 

1914 Land was purchased for the Wyman Park site. 

1925 City wells were dug two and a half miles south of town. 

1936 A city sewer system was installed. 



EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY INDUSTRIES- 



The Dairy Industry 

The mooing of cows used to be one of the famihar sounds in town, for 
many families kept them in barns behind their houses. A few of these 
small barns remain on the east edge of town. For those who did not own 
a cow, Rev. S. R. Harshman ran a deUvery wagon supplying towns- 
people with fresh milk from his dairy herd on the south side of town 
(42). His customers filled their pans from a spigot on the five gallon 
cans, paying 5 cents a quart. 

Around 1905-1910, good Jersey herds were developed by farmers in 
the area and they either sold their cream to local cream stations twice a 
week, or shipped it to Chicago or Danville to be made into butter. This 
product had a nut-like flavor, far inferior to home made sweet cream 
butter, for the cream had soured by the time it reached its destination. 
One of the local cream buyers was the Wadley Company, later operated 
by Chal Newbould. 

With the establishment of the Isaacs brothers' Sullivan Dairy (43) in 
1927, and the Armour Creamery (44) in 1932, the method of handling 
local dairy products improved. The Dairy made ice cream, butter and 
cottage cheese, selling it from house to house and delivering it to about 
twenty schools in the area. Armour Creamery sold its cheese 
throughout the country, and ran twenty-seven trucks in a six county 
area to pick up its milk. 



Brown Shoe Company 

During the 1920's, the Sullivan Community Club, the forerunner of 
the Chamber of Commerce, worked to entice industry to town. Brown 
Shoe Company of St. Louis agreed to set up a plant at SuUivan if the 
community would provide $125,000 for a building to house the factory 
(45 )t. Through a great amount of sacrifice and work the money was 
raised and the factory opened in 1930. Today it employs 375. 



Community Industries (42)t 

An important industry for the prosperity of SulUvan was established 
in the 1930's by the Church of Jesus Christ under the leadership of 
Leah Harshman, the daughter of Rev. S. R. Harshman, the founder of 
the church. In the words of Miss Harshman: 

It was always a principle of the church to help its members and 
to keep them from becoming public charges. . .The serious 
depression of the early 1930' s, however, brought employment in 
Sullivan to a standstill. . .There was little work. . .aside from 
that provided by relief projects and these, the church people 
believed, did not contribute to lasting prosperity. 




THE SECOND PLANNING MILL was built by Appollos Hagerman 
and Rufus Harshman after an 1896 fire destroyed the old mill operated 
by L. T. Hagerman and W. A. Duncan. The planning mill developed 
into a large contracting business that worked throughout the area. 



The women of the church developed a number of good recipes for 
candy bars and began marketing candy. Others began a dress making 
enterprise. By 1939, there were 50 people employed in these activities in 
buildings all over town. At this time, a concrete building was completed 
by church members, the materials being supplied by Harshmanite 
construction firms in town. Today, Community Industries has evolved 
into three separate enterprises making dresses, candy, and lawn and 
garden equipment, and employing 475 people. 



WYMAN PARK- 

Albert Wyman loved to walk. Every morning of the year, good 
weather or bad, he went a mile or two before he opened his shoe shop. 
While traveling the dusty or muddy country roads, the idea of creating 
a park must have formed in his mind. 

He fought in the Civil War after immigrating from Germany. By 
1870, he was in SuUivan, and in a few years had a successful shoe 
business. He lived alone in a room above his store on the square. 
Having never married, he had no heirs. At his death, $40,000 was left to 
the city for a park, with the stipulation that all things held on its 
premises would be free. 

In 1914, the city decided to purchase the pasture of J. B. Titus (46)t. 
Freeland Grove was bought separately, and on the east side a large 
pavilion (47 )t was built for commercial activities. The mayor, Finley 
Pifer, arranged for the park to be beautifully landscaped featuring elm 
trees along the roads, a lake on the north, and a bandstand in the 
Freeland Grove area. 



A FEW OLD AND INTERESTING HOMES AROUND TOWN- 



Stewart-Lucas-Nicolay House (48)t SW corner, Water and Polk 

This may be the oldest existing house in town, for the back two 
rooms were apparently built around 1855 by Lafayette Stewart, a 
merchant. The fireplace between the rooms warmed Lincoln, for he is 
said to have stayed here while traveling on the Charleston Road that 
passed in front of the house. The Kilner and Lucas families lived here 
for fifty years prior to 1937, when the Nicolays bought it. The ar- 
chitectural style of the whole house is Greek Revival, dating it to the 
1850's. It is built with walnut and hickory probably cut from timber 
near SulUvan. The front porch, added later, hides the lovely entrance. 

Elder- Steele- Shirey House (49)t east side of Calhoun at end of Harrison 
Either Dr. T. Y. Lewis or William Elder, his brother-in-law, built this 
home in the 1860's. It was sold by Elder to W. A. Steele in 1885. Steele 
also purchased the Merchant's and Farmer's Bank the Elders had 
started. The addition to the north was built at a later date by Steele. 
The Shirey family has owned it for forty years. 

Patterson-Shuman-Brandenburger House (50)t SE corner, Adams and 
Polk 

This was one of the most imposing houses in town when it was 
erected in the 1860's. WilHam G. Patterson, a native of Canada, built it 
soon after coming to Sullivan to practice law. O. B. Lowe, Patterson's 
son-in-law, Hved here prior to 1903, when Charles Shuman, a proprietor 
of the First National Bank, bought it. The Brandenburgers acquired it 
in the 1950's. It is built in the Italian style, having the typical rounded 
windows. It once had a turret on the roof, and a porch extended across 
the west side. 

Eden-Martin-Bfeals House (51) t NW corner, Jefferson and McClellan 

This home was built around 1874 by John R. Eden, a prominent 
lawyer in Sullivan and a politician. He was a member of the U. S. House 
of Representatives for five terms, serving during the troubled Civil War 
and Reconstruction. While in Congress, he was a member of the 
committee to investigate the disputed presidential election of 1876 
between Hayes and Tilden. Eden was an unsuccessful Democratic 
candidate for governor in 1868. 

The houses described above are only representatives of the many fine 
old homes in Sullivan. A few are pictured on the opposite page along 
with other notable homes. 



STEWART-LUCAS 
NICOLAY HOUSE 

[1850's] 

PATERSON-SHUMAN 

BRANDENBURGER 

HOUSE [1860's] 




ELDER-STEELE-SHIREY 
HOUSE [1860's] 



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J. H. BAKER-TABOR 
DOLAN HOUSE 

[1905] 

TITUS-SENTEL 
HOUSE 

[1896] 



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CIVIL WAR VETERANS assembled at Jonathan Creek for a 
memorial service. The first three men on the front row are Jess Bell, Ike 
McBroom, and Tom Fultz. Judge W. G. Cochran may be the fifth man. 
The three men on the right of the second row are Mack Birch, Nelson E. 
Powell, and John England. The first man in the top row is Asa 
Johnson. Unfortunately, the others are unidentified. 

*VELCOME HOME WORLD WAR I VETERANS! This arch was at 
he intersection of Harrison and Main in 1919. The First National Bank 
s on the left and the Merchant and Farmer's State Bank is on the right 





"GOOD-BYE. BOYS!" The whole town came out to see Company C 
leave for the Mexican Border in 1917, 



FROM THE PAPERS- 

1875--"Chal Stanley is studying law. Oh, what a host of lawyers 
Sullivan will turn loose in a year or two. " 

1886--"Notice: I would be much obliged to the boys who have been 
visiting my apples after night if they would close the hole, as they are 
liable to freeze this cold weather... H. Hunt." 

1880--"Mssrs. Spitler & Son have overhauled the opera house grocery 
store, and have cleaned it from top to bottom, a consumation devoutly 
wished for by its patrons." 

1869--"Football! Yes, that's a very pleasant game for those who delight 
in it, but we are not of that number. By some of our friends, we were 
induced, a few mornings since, to take part in the interesting. play (as 
they called it). We played, kicked and knocked 'for all that was in 
sight'; hopped around as nimbly as a snowbird; enjoyed it muchly at 
the time, but as to the result, oh my! A stiff leg, in fact two of 'em! Two 
lame arms! A disabled body, generally! and a busted boot! We have not 
entirely recovered yet. Such was our experience. Do you centure (sic) us 
for not admiring the game? Not any more, thank you, we are satisfied!" 



SULLIVAN BUSINESS SPONSORS 



AIMEE'S BOTTLE HOUSE 

COLDEST BEER IN TOWN 


DAIRY QUEEN BRAIZER 


ALLEN'S SERVICE CENTER 


DREW'S SHOES 


ANDERSON GIFT SHOP 

1948 Gifts-Cards 1973 


DUNSCOMB 

Fine Furniture since 1918 


ARTHUR C. ERDMANN 

for the Country Companies 


ELZY'S 

Flowers and Gifts 


ATCHISON OIL CO. INC. 

Sullivan & Decatur 


FAMILY SHOE CENTER 


BARNES 

Floor and Wall Covering 


FASHION SHOP, INC. 


BECK'S AUTO REPAIR 

408 N. Seymour St. 


FELICITY FASHIONS, INC. 


BOB and LIDA'S 
CLEANING CENTER 


FIRST NATIONAL BANK 


BOOHER FEED CO. 


HAMILTON'S MENS WEAR 

Men and Boy's Clothing 


BOOKER SERVICE 

304 S. VanBuren 


HARSHMAN, P. H. & E CO. 

since 1901 


BROWN SHOE COMPANY 

since 1930 


HEZZY'S DRIVE INN 
AND BOWL 


BUXTON and MERCER 

Small Engine Repair 


HORN INSURANCE AGENCY 


CHAPPEL BODY SHOP 

Route 32, South 


HUGHES & WOOLEN 

STATIONS Kerr McGee 


CHAPPEL GARAGE 

408 N. Fuller 


JEFFERS MOTOR SERVICE 

Wheel Alignment 


COLLINS SHELL SERVICE 


JEFFERSON ICE. CO. 


CORLEY 
INTERNATIONAL, INC. 


JIBBY'S TAVERN 

The Spot For Fun 


COUNTRY COMPANIES 

Farm Insurance for 45 years 


JOHN'S PHARMACY 



KAISER AGRICULTURAL 
CHEMICALS 



KASKIA TRUE VALUE 
HARDWARE 



KEN'S FOOD STORES 



KITE WOODWORKING CO. 

Electric Garage Doors 



Merle Norman Cosmetics 

For a More Beautiful You 



METALLIZING CO. OF 
AMERICA, INC. 



MILROY MOTEL 



MR. DRUMSTICK 

Family Restaurant 



KNOTTY PINE TAVERN 

Package Goods 



MONTGOMERY WARD 

Catalog Agency 



LAKE AND LAWN 
SUPPLIES GREENHOUSES 



LANCASTER DRUG STORE 



LANDERS SEED CO., INC. 

Seeds since 1936 

LEE NORTON REALTOR 



LEE'S SPORT SHOP 

24 hr. Bait & Tackle Service 



LEHMAN AND JIVIDEN 
IGA FOODLINER 



MOSCHENROSE JEWELERS 



MOULTRIE CO. H. I. A 

Bluecross - Blueshield 



Moultrie Shelby F.S Inc. 



NEAL BODY SHOP 

111 N. Hamilton 



NOLEN'S UPHOLSTERY 

408 N. Fuller 



LITTLE THEATRE 
ON THE SQUARE 

LIVERGOOD GRAIN CO. 

Findlay-Chipps-Coles 



LIVERGOOD REAL ESTATE 



LUCY ELLEN CANDIES 

F and F Laboratories 



MARY'S BEAUTY SHOP 

Licensed Cosmetologist 



MAXEDON 

Signs and Campers 



O. K. JOBBERS 

Auto and Implement Supplies 



P. N. HIRSCH AND CO. 



Pat Stone's Beauty Salon 

Open 6 Days Weekly 



PAUL ROMANO PIZZA 



POLAND'S BARBER SHOP 

Prop. Larry Clagg 



PRAIRIE STUDIOS 

Art School 



REED'S SULLIVAN 



MCLAUGHLIN AND HARGIS 

Insurance and Real Estate 



RHODES LUMBER CO. 



ROLEY REAL ESTATE 

since 1953 



RUSSELL M. HARSHMAN 

Concrete since 1920 

SALT ON MY TAIL YARNS 



SEAR'S CATALOG 
MERCHANT 



Toad sez see 

KENNY INSURANCE 



THE DEPOT 

Antiques and Gifts 



THE DRESS HOUSE 

Dresses-Coats-Sportswear 



THE INDEX 

40 years same location 



SHASTEEN MOTORS, INC. 

Ford Sales and Services 



THE NICKELODEON 

Ice Cream- Records-Tapes 



SHORTY'S CAFE 

4 AM-4:30 PM W.D. 



THE RED FOX 

Tues-Sat 11-1 AM Sun 11-7 PM 



STATE BANK OF SULLIVAN 



THE SHIRLEY SHOP 

Licensed Cosmetologist 



STUBBLEFIELD, INC. 

Automotive and Marine 



STYLE LAND 



SULLIVAN AUTO SUPPLY 

American Parts Jobber 



SULLIVAN BAKERY 

25th Anniversary Year 



SULLIVAN GRAIN CO. 

since 1928 



THE SPOT RESTAURANT 



THE SULLIVAN BOWL 



THE SULLIVAN PROGRESS 

since 1856 - 116 yrs of service 



TOM WEST, INC. 

Chev-Olds-Cadillac 



WALKER PIPE CO. 

since 1930 



SULLIVAN MARATHON 

203 W. Jackson 

Sullivan Mutual Fire Ins. Co. 
In Business since 1906 



Sullivan Savings and Loan 
85 Years of service 



SULLIVAN STAR MARKET 



Jim and WARD Furniture 
Ella May Carpeting 



WATERS RADIATOR 

1 blk. north of Hezzy's 



WAYNE H. SMITH AGENCY 

Real Estate & Insurance 



SULLIVAN SUNOCO 

111 N. Jackson 



SULLIVAN WOOD PRODUCTS 

Home of Fine Cabinets 



WESTERN AUTO STORE 

The Family Store 



William E. Graven 

STATE FARM INS. AGENCY 



WOOD INSURANCE AGENCY 

since 1929 



WOOLEN AND DENTON 

TV Sales and Service 



YARDMAN, INC. 



SULLIVAN PROFESSIONAL PATRONS 



A. K. MERRIMAN, D.V.M. 


MCLAUGHLIN AND STONE 


BEST CLINIC 
ASSOCIATION 


MCMULLIN FUNERAL HOME 

since 1929 


C. J. ELLIOTT, D.D.S. 


RALPH L. FULLER, O.D. 


DONALD M. 
BUTLER, D.D.S. 


ROBERT F. WHITE 


GENERAL TELEPHONE 
OF ILLINOIS 


SULLIVAN VETERINARY 
CLINIC 


GEORGE A. RONEY, O.D. 

Optometrist since 1919 


VERNON E. ELDER 


H. E. KENDALL, M.D. 


WILLIAM C. INGRAM 


MATHIAS CHIROPRACTIC 
CENTER 


WILLIAM E. ALWERDT, 
D.D.S. 



INDEX 



Anderson, E. 16 

Andrews, G. O. 20 

Andrus, F. M. 16 

Ansbacher, Mose 20 

Asa Creek 4, 5 

Asa's Point 4 

Ashworth, F. E. 16 

Baker, John H. 27, 33, 34 

Baker, Joseph H. 15, 16, 39 

banks 22, 38. 41 

Barkley, D. M. 16 

Bastion, Eunice 13 

Bastion, N. S. 13 

Bastion Seminary 13, 21 

Beats house 38 

Bell, Jess 41 

Berry, Rebecca 29 

Beveridge, Albert J. 21, 31 

BeveridKe. T. H. 16, 31 

Birch, Mack 41 

blacksmiths 6, 7, 22, 23 

Boka, Henry 16 

Brandenburger house 38, 39 

brick yards 13, 26 

Bristow, D. F. 27 

Brockway, B. W. 16 

Brooks, Sam 13 

broom corn 26 

Brosam Bros. Bakery 21 

Brosam. George 16 

Bruce 27 

buffalo 3, 31 

"Bunker Hill" 30 

Bury, H. W. 16 

Bushman, F. W. 16 

Butler. Louis 16 

Campbell, David 9 

Campfield Point 6 

Cantrill. William 5, 6 

Carriker, H. W. 16 

cemetery 29, 30 

Chamber of Commerce 35 

Chapman's Hardware 23 

Charleston Road 4, 38 

Chipps, A. 16 

churches 7, 13, 14, 40 

CIPS 34 

Circuit Court 7, 8, 9, 10 

Civic Center 3 

Civil War 17, 29. 36, 41 

Cochran, Charles Martin 5 

Cochran, Judge W. G. 41 

Cokely, Dennis 13 

Coles County 17 

Collins, Charlie 29 

Conn and Bros. 16 

Cooper, Glen 8 

Corbin, W. P. 14. 16, 22 

courthouses 5, 6, 8, 9, 13, 18. 

19, 34 
Creech, A. S. 20 
Crowe, Charles 22 
Cushman 27 

dairy industry 35 
Darrow, Clarence 34 
Davis, B. F. 16 
Davis. David 1, 7, 8. 10 
Decatur 6 
Dix, A. J. 16 
Dolan house 39 
Dooley, Ann 16 
Douglas, Mahlon 16 
Douglas. Stephan A. 10, 11 
Duncan. W. A. 36 
Dunn 13, 27 
Eagle Pond 4, 7 
Earp, Joel 6 
Tarp, S. P. 16 
East Nelson 4, 5, 6, 10 
Eden Hack 23, 29 
Eden House 15, 23, 29 
Eden, John R. 12. 15. 16, 20, 
38 



Eden, Judge Joseph 13, 15, 16 

Elder, Judge James 10, 15, 29 

Elder, William 16, 22, 38, 39 

electricity 33, 34 

elevators 27 

England, John 41 

Essex 5 

Eureka College 7 

Everett. B. B. 16 

Ewing, R. B. 5 

factories 14, 15. 16, 27, 29, 35, 

36 
fairs 26, 29 
Farlow 27 
Fin, J. 16 
Finley, Mike 27 
fire protection 14, 34 
Fort Moultrie 4, 19 
Frederick, A. A. 16 
Freeland, C. J. 16 
Freeland Grove 3. 11, 36 
Freeland, James S. 13 
Freeland, John A. 4, 6, 11, 

13. 17 
Fultr. Tom 41 
Funderburk. Isaac 7 

GAR 29 

Garland and Patterson IS 

Gillham, P. B. 16 

Ginn. Robert 10 

Glasgow 5. 6 

Goben, P. F. 16 

Goats. J. 16 

Gowan. G. W. 16 

Green. Alvin P. 16 

Green, F. M. 11 

Hagerman, AppoUos IS, 36 

Hagerman, L. T. 36 

Hale. Philo 5 

Hamilton, Parnell 5 

Hampton, Rowland 6 

Harris, Carleton 29, 30 

Harris, Charles T. 16 

Harshman, Leah 35 

Harshman. P. B. 27 

Harshman, Rev. S. R. 35 

Harshman, Rufus 36 

Hefferman. John 16 

Henry, Bushrod W. 7. 13 

Hess. Henry 29 

Hoke, F. P. 16 

holidays 11, 29, 32 

horses 23. 29 

hotels 7. 10. 15. 27 

Hunt. H. 16. 42 

ice business 31, 32 

Illinois Bridge and Iron 

Works 27 
Indians 9 
Isaac brothers 35 

jail 8 

Jennings, Benjamin S. 16. 29 

Johnson, Asa 41 

Kaskaskia River 4 

Keedy and Brown 6 

Keedy, J. L. 16 

Kellar, Dr. William 5, 30 

Kennedy, John F. 3 

Kilner, George 16 

Kilner house 38 

Kilner. Walter 16 

Kirkbride. J. W. 16 

Kirkwood, W. 16 

Layman. Mathias 16. 21 

Lee. A. B. 16 

Lewis. Dr. T. Y. 16, 19, 20. 

38 
library 34 
Lincoln,, Abraham 9, 10, 11, 

31 38 
Lindsay. R. W. 16 
liveries 23 



Lowe, O. B. 33. 38 

Lucas house 38. 39 

Lynn. R. 16 

Macon County 5 

Marrowbone Township 6. 7 

Marshall. A. T. 16 

Martin. Andrew 16 

Martin house 38 

Martin. I. J. 17 

Matoon 13. 17 

Mayer's Dry Goods 21 

McBroom. Ike 41 

McClelland 29 

McClure's Grocery 16. 21 

McCune. Jacob 4 

Meeker, J. 16 

Miley, A. 16, 31 

Miller, Dr. A. D. 29 

mills 15. 29, 30, 31. 36 

Mills, E. W. 16 

Minor. J. L. 16 

Mize. W. J. 16 

Morrell. S. H. IS 

Moultrie County Historical 

and Genealogical Society 1 
Moultrie. Gen. William 4 
Mouser. I. J. 21 
Newbould. Chal 35 
newspapers 8. 15, 20 
Nichols. O. B. 16 
Nicolay house 38, 39 
Nixon, Richard M. 2, 3 
Noyes, Ebenezer 5 
Old Nelson 4 
Oglesby, Richard J. 6 
Oglesby. Warner W. 6 
patriotism 6. 29, 41, 42 
Patterson, Dock 16 
Patterson, Donty 16, 29 
Patterson, Jonathan 29 
Patterson. Levi 7 
Patterson, William 16, 29. 38. 

39 
Peddicord, B. B. 30 
Ferryman, John S 
Pifer, Charlie 32 
Pifer, David 26 
Pifer. D. L. 16 
Pifer, Finley 36 
Pifer. Guy 32 
Pifer's Park 32 
Pifer, Samuel 26 
Pike, Harry J. 20 
Ping, A. 16 
Poland. Chandler 32 
police 12, 34 

politics 10, 11, 15. 22. 31, 38 
ponds 4, 31 
postal service 6. 21 
Powell, Nelson E. 41 
Powers sisters 33 
prairie 4, 13, 14 
prohibition 12. 34 
Purvis, Lawrence 29 
railroads 5. 14. 17, 18. 27. 

28. 29. 30 
Randoll, Thomas 6 
recreation 42 

Rice. Asa "Dollarhide" 4 
Ritter. C. P. 16 
Ritter. D. M. 16 
Roane. Charles L. 16, 22 
Roley Grocery 23 
Sanders, J. F. 16 
Schmugge. T. F. 16 
schools 7, 13, 32, 33 
Scott. Andrew 6. 8 
Seaney, Owen 6. 7, 16 
Seaney. William 16 
Sentel. Winifred Titus 19. 39 
sewer system 34 
Shelbyville 6 
Shepherd. E. L. 16 



INDEX 



Shepherd, J. B. 16 
Shirey house 38, 39 
Shuman. Charles 38. 39 
sidewalks 12, 34 
Smith, Prof. Washington 13 
Smyser, A. N. 16, 22 
Smyser, W. H. 16 
Snyder, J. H. 16. 29 
sod-corn row 8, 12 
S?ona. Fred 19, 21 
Sona, Joseph 16 
Spitler, L. M. 20. 42 
Stanley, Chal 42 
Stanley. W. M. 16 
Stearns, D. F. 16 
Steele, W. A. 22, 38. 39 
Stewart. Lafayette 38. 39 



Stiers, J. B. 16 
street lights 33, 34 
street signs 34 
Stringfield, T. B. 16 
Sullivan Community Club 35 
Sullivan, Gen. John 4 
Sullivan's Island 4 
swamp lands 13 
Tabor, Homer 15, 31 
Tabor house 39 
Taylor, Beverly 7 
Taylor, James T. 12 
telephone system 34 
Thomason, Arnold 6 
Thomason, Joseph 6, 7, 16 
Thompson, Victor 16 



Thunemann, William 16 
Tichenor, Milton 16 
Titus. Elizabeth 16 
Titus, J. B. 16. 19, 36, 39 
Titus Opera House 19. 20 
Townsend. W. B. 16 
Trower. X. B. 16, 22 

Vadakin, H. F. 16, 20 

Waggoner, Joseph 21 
water supply 14, 34 
W.C.T.U. fountain 19 
Wheat, John W. 7 
Williams, John 16 
Woody. T. F. 16 
Wyman, Albert 22, 36 
Wyman Park 3, 22, 31, 34, 36 



The formation of the Moultrie 
County Historical Society in 1967 
brought together people from the area 
who were interested in local history. No 
other organization in the county could 
claim such a varied membership, 
having people of all ages and all 
occupations. 

In 1973, recognizing the booming 
popularity of genealogy, the group 
reorganized, becoming the Moultrie 
County Historical and Genealogical 
Society. The objective of the new 
society is to stimulate an interest in 
local history and genealogy, and to 
preserve information for future 
generations. The society will publish a 
quarterly in the near future, and wants 
to find a permanent place for meetings 
and a small historical and genealogical 
library. 

The society encourages interested 
persons to attend its informative 
monthly meetings, and to aid it in its 
goals. 



2 J 4 5~ 

Historic Sites 

In the City of Sullivan 

1845-1973 



^ By Moultrie County Historical and_Genealogical Soclet]/ 




Dt 

.' t Cre'd«r _ Street ;: 

OOlDii 



nnij 



Hiinltr Street 



— RoutM 32 A 121- 





Z Strain Street 

□ □LlLinnLllJiliLJLJiDL] 

% ^ t Blackwood Street 2 $ K S 

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QlduiLJalaLjiyiuiniulGlcjl 

□ □ □ n rl n r 1 n n n n n n [ ]in n 
^H LJ L. J [ 1 n n G n iln [ ] li n i ]tj 

□ [^ L J M 4 u u 1 ] nt J □ n ; ^5 [ J c 
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Snyde. , 

K.ng Street 

DDnnn 

Louii Street 

DD 



1 — PerrvTien House Site 

1— Fteeland Log CeBln Sile 

J— Eerp Saloon Sile, O'dwt Building on Square 

J-OOIMOV Store Site 

5-Firs! Blacksmltn Shop Slle 

*-Flfil School House 5il( 

'-Setono scfiooi House sue 

(-Tavlor Holel Sue, Tilui Opera Houie Slle 

9-5rlcol Fust Cnurch (Mrlhodilli 

10 Chrlsltan Cnurcn Localfon (ISSl mi] 

11 — Presbyter lan's First Church Sile 
l!-Moultrie County CourlHouie (1847, IW). anO UMI 
13— James Elder's First Mouse, Eden Houie Building 



n— Old Fair Grounds 
33-HeSs Cigar Factory SI 
3<-Cily Floucino Mills SI1 
3i— woolen Mill Slle 
3a— Gresnnm Ctmflery, ' 
I Beyerldge 



I Works Site 



39- Norm Sid 






UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 

977.3675M86C , C001 

CENTURY 1 SULLIVAN? ILL 





3 0112 025396489